Richard is currently chair of the Ocean Biogeochemistry and Ecosystems group at NOC and an honorary Professor at the University of Southampton. He has degrees in Chemistry, Oceanography and Environmental Science with the early part of his research career focussed on the cycling of inorganic nutrients in the hypernutrified estuaries in Eastern England. Since 2000, when he moved to NOC, he has worked on the Biological Carbon Pump, the biologically mediated mechanisms by which ocean life controls climate. Research highlights have included quantitatively linking the supply of the biolimiting nutrient (Fe) to the key ecosystem service of carbon sequestration in polar waters, identifying the Fe limited status of the N Atlantic and closing the mesopelagic C budget at the PAP site, thereby resolving a longstanding problem in biological oceanography. He is leading a 3.7 Million pound NERC large grant to work on the controls over mesopelagic mineralisation with fieldwork in the Benguela Upwelling and Southern Ocean and is also working on the oceanic uptake of anthropogenically remobilised atmospheric CO2. In the future he plans to work extensively on the transfer of terrestrial organic matter from land to sea and its fate in coastal waters, initially via a large project in the UK, eventually taking this expertise into S Hemisphere and tropical settings.
Richard Sanders

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We are pleased to announce that registration for the 2017 Challenger Society Ocean Modelling meeting is now open.The meeting will be held 11-12th September 2017 at the Met Office, Exeter.

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MARELEC 2017

Marelec17
The world’s foremost conference on marine electromagnetics incorporating an exhibition and poster session.

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AMBIO VIII registration and abstract submission open!

The Scottish Association for Marine Science (SAMS) are pleased to invite you to Oban for the Advances in Marine Biogeochemistry (AMBIO) VIII Conference 6 - 8th Sept 2017. The conference will present state-of-the-art research and technology in UK marine biogeochemistry.

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